7 Things You Need to Avoid When Flying with Your Dog

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7 Things You Need to Avoid When Flying with Your Dog© Pinterest

Sometimes, you just cannot leave your precious furry friend at home. But if you don’t take some specific aspects of flying into consideration, your dog’s life could be at a huge risk.

In fact, flying together with your pooch is far from being fun as it adds to the stress of getting yourself through security and to your boarding area. Well, this doesn’t mean that it’s impossible to fly with a pet, but you should be well-prepared before arriving at the airport.

CLICK ON NEXT TO CHECK OUT THESE 7 THINGS DOG OWNERS SHOULD NEVER EVER DO WHEN FLYING WITH THEIR PETS

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Putting your dog in cargo during summer or winter

Putting your dog in cargo during summer or winter

© Rover.com

If your beloved pooch’s weight exceeds 20 pounds, then she or he has to fly in cargo. But if it’s summer or winter, flying with your dog can be very uncomfortable for your pet at best and life-threatening at worst.

Actually, the harsh weather condition in both of these seasons can result in uncontrollable temperatures that can put your pup’s life in serious danger. If you really need to travel during winter or summer, you should either board your dog during the flight or leave them at home with a pet sitter to ensure their safety.

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Feeding your dog immediately before flying

Feeding your dog immediately before flying

© Pets4Homes

Many pets get sick while flying, and this is particularly predictable if they had a meal right before takeoff. In fact, experts recommend dog owners to completely avoid feeding their pups 4-6 hours before the trip.

Also, keep in mind that leaving a full water bowl next to your pooch will definitely end up causing lots of discomforts as it’s likely to spill. What you should rather do is place ice cubes in a water tray that can be attached to your dog’s crate.

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Tranquilizing your dog

Tranquilizing your dog

© PetMD

Giving your dog tranquilizers before travel might seem like a great idea to keep stress at bay. Yet, you should never ever give your pet tranquilizers without a prescription from the vet.

Before tranquilizing your pup, try to think about other options, such as herbal relaxers and sedatives, but again, make sure to consult your veterinarian first.

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Making layover stops while flying

Flying over the holidays

© The Cheat Sheet

If you feel exhausted by the end of a flight that had multiple layover stops, then imagine how your little furry friend would be feeling. When flying with your dog, you should make the trip as short as possible by booking only direct flights.

Remember that travel can be stressful, dehydrating, and difficult for your dog.

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Flying over the holidays

Flying over the holidays

© Travel + Leisure

If you’re planning to fly somewhere over the holidays, you should seriously consider leaving your dog at home. From extremely busy employees to overcrowded airports, traveling during this time with your pooch will only make things much more stressful for everyone involved.

You should rather hire a dog sitter or maybe consider making a road trip with your furry buddy instead of flying.

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Putting a short-nosed dog in cargo

Putting a short-nosed dog in cargo

© Caring Vets

Short-nosed dog breeds risk life-threatening danger when placed in cargo, so it should be avoided at all costs. Short-nosed dogs include Shih Tzu, Shar-Pei, Pug, Lhasa Apso, King Charles Spaniel, French or English Bulldog, Boxer, Boston Terrier, and American Bulldog.

These dogs are banned from airplanes between June 1 and September 30 because of their respiratory problems, in addition to the stress of circulation and temperature (which should be between 45 and 85 °F.)

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Putting your dog in an overhead compartment

Putting your dog in an overhead compartment

© Business Insider

If your dog weighs under 20 pounds and can fit into a TSA-approved animal carrier, he or she will be very welcomed to fly next to you. Yet, you should put your dog or cat in the luggage area over your head even if a crew member suggests placing them there.

Instead, tuck your pup under the seat in front of you to keep them safe and comfortable.

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