How To Choose The Best First Puppy For Your Kids

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Last Updated on December 23, 2019

How To Choose The Best First Puppy For Your Kids

©AARP

How to choose the best puppy for children who dream of having one?

Dogs can bring so much joy to human hearts and make a wonderful addition to every family. However, many families have endured nightmarish stories after bringing a dog home because things don’t go as expected.

Heartbreakingly, many male puppies endure euthanasia due to “behaving badly” and such cases can leave the entire family emotionally damaged.

To endure avoiding this sort of tragedy, you need to choose the best first puppy for your family carefully, wisely, and without any predetermined dog breeds in mind. You need to start from scratch while only focusing on finding the best puppy for your kids.

To help you out, here are 10 tips for selecting the ideal puppy for your little family.

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#1 – Your new puppy should suit your lifestyle

Choosing a dog breed that would fit in perfectly to your lifestyle is crucial to successful pet ownership.

For example, large dog breeds who require lots of outdoor exercises will never fit in a fourth-floor apartment with no garden, just like toy-sized lap dog breeds can never be expected to follow you or your kids around or endure long walks.

You can turn to a veterinarian for a pre-puppy consultation so you can get a clear idea of what dog breed will suit your family. Online questionnaires can also offer you some guidance. Whatever you do, don’t let the pictures of cute puppies fool you, be sure you’ll be able to handle their adult versions first.

#2 – A pedigree puppy or a cross-bred?

Unlike popular belief, a pedigree breed doesn’t necessarily make the best family dogs. Although this breed gives families the advantage of knowing what their puppy will look like as an adult dog, having the insurance rates covered for vet fees are quite expensive when it comes to pedigree dogs.

That’s simply because a pedigree breed has higher risks for requires veterinary attention than a cross-bred dog.

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